Category Archives: physicians

productive day #2!

Wheeeew! Being productive is getting exhausting! I may have to slow things down a bit today 😉

Yesterday morning started off with a strength session (go, self!) and then a quick shower before throwing dinner in the crock pot. I dashed out the door with my hair in a frizzy mess and worked until after 7pm (I didn’t get to break away from the nephrologist until 4pm — I was GROWLING for lunch!). I got in the door at 8pm and the smells of Thanksgiving infused the house. YUM! Mr. Prevention had even followed directions for our brussel’s sprouts. Impressive. The crock pot and I are officially bonding, I would say…another successful crock pot meal 😀

8 am:

8 pm:

Note: You can’t judge a crock pot recipe by looks alone!! 😉

Cranberry Pork Roast from A Year of Slow Cooking and Bean Town Baker

1 (2.5-3 lb) pork tenderloin (I used 2 1/2#), trimmed
1 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp dried mustard
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
2 Tbsp cornstarch
1 cup fresh cranberries
1/2 1/4 cup white sugar + 1/4 cup Splenda granular
1/2 1/4 cup + 2 Tbsp brown sugar
1/3 cup golden raisins
1 3 cloves garlic, chopped
1/3 cup diet cranberry juice made with Splenda
1/2 small lemon, thinly sliced

Directions:

Use a 4 quart crockpot. In a plastic zipper bag, put dry spices and cornstarch and add meat. Shake to coat. Put contents into your slow cooker.

Add cranberry sauce, or your fresh cranberries and sugar. Put in raisins and garlic. Pour in cranberry juice, and top with lemon slices.

Cover and cook on low for 8 hours (I cooked mine for 12 hours), or high for about 4. The longer you cook the meat, the more tender it will be. Serves 7 (about 5 ounces after being cooked).

Nutrition Information (per serving): 374 calories; 7.8 g. fat; 128 mg. cholesterol; 261 mg. sodium; 28.3 g. carbohydrate; 1.1 g. fiber; 46 g. protein

Result: It was an early Thanksgiving in the Prevention household! What a nice surprise! We loved this dish – it was so tender, and because of the low and slow cooking time with the long duration, the meat shredded with a fork. Mr. Prevention preferred this pork to the Slow Cooked Char Siu Pork I made last week. I liked both, but I definitely appreciate the leanness of the tenderloin cut – very low fat!! If you’re looking for an early T-day treat, look no further…it’s the perfect fall delight!

And Mr. P managed to put the Brussel’s sprouts in the oven…

1 lb Brussel’s sprouts tossed in olive oil, 1/4 cup pecans, salt, and pepper. Roast for 35 minutes at 350° F. Sprinkle with 1-2 ounces of Gorgonzola and bake another 3-4 minutes. DELISH!

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I emailed lots of fellow RD and bloggers yesterday morning to see who would be interested in collaborating on a RD Q&A. I’ve had an amazing response and I look forward to adding a tab on my blog about becoming an RD, the schooling involved, what internships are like, job outlook for RD’s, career paths for RD’s, and our best advice for those entering the field. I get questions weekly from readers who are interested in nutrition, and I hope that joining forces with other RD’s and bloggers will help those interested! So look for that in a week or so! I’m excited!

Question: What did you want to be when you were a little kid?

I remember wanting to be a professional figure skater…and now I play ice-hockey. My, how things change! 😉

Bon voyage to my parental unit who are off to the shores of Puerto Vallarta for the week. I am green with envy! Off to work I go…!

Have a fabulous day!

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Filed under blog, blog topic request, crock pot, dietitians, dinner, doctors, exercise, fruits and vegetables, garlic, healthy cooking, hockey, hunger, meat consumption, physical activity, physicians, protein, recipe, sugar substitutes, travel, work

assembly line to dinner

I wasn’t surprised when Mr. Prevention requested Biggest Loser “Fried” Chicken this week…it has been a few months since we last had this recipe, and it is a favorite of ours. Who doesn’t love fried chicken minus the unhealthiness of frying? But this recipe does require quite the assembly line: cornstarch and spices –> egg whites –> bread crumbs. Not difficult once you’ve got the pattern down, and certainly easier the second time you make the recipe. Though not as quite as basic as microwave potato chips! 😉

 

Biggest Loser “Fried Chicken”

2 pounds chicken tenders
1 quart 1% buttermilk
2 cups whole wheat breadcrumbs
1 cup cornstarch
2 tsp paprika
1 Tbsp + 1 tsp organic seasoning Salt
1 Tbsp ground black pepper
Large pinch cayenne pepper
4 egg whites, beaten to very soft peaks
Pam cooking spray or olive oil

Directions:

Soak chicken tenders in refrigerator, in buttermilk, for 6 hours or overnight.

Drain and blot with paper towels to remove excess buttermilk. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 325° F. Lay bread crumbs out on a baking sheet and bake until golden brown, stirring occasionally, about 40 minutes. Cool.

Increase oven heat to 450º F. Combine cornstarch, paprika, seasoning salt, black pepper, and cayenne in a large Pyrex dish – mix well.

Dredge drained and blotted chicken tenders in seasoned starch. Next, coat dredged tenders thoroughly with beaten egg whites. Last, dip tenders in toasted panko to fully coat. Place chicken tenders on a foil-lined baking sheet, fitted with a baking rack. Lightly spray chicken on both sides with Pam and season lightly with salt, if desired. Bake for about 12 – 15 minutes or until outside is crispy and chicken is just cooked through and juicy. Yield: 8 servings.

Nutrition Information (per serving): 270 calories; 4 g. fat (1 g. saturated fat); 65 mg. cholesterol; 210 mg. sodium; 27 g. carbohydrate; 2 g. fiber; 28 g. protein

Result: Good as ever! Always a favorite! You can always make 1/2 or even 1/4th of this recipe. I usually make 1/2 and there’s plenty of leftovers which reheat beautifully! It’s a perfect, healthy comfort food meal. Of course, Mr. Prevention slathers his chicken fingers in one of several Buffalo Wild Wing sauces *eye roll* Wing sauce is definitely his most prized condiment.

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I got in my lower body strength session last night – WOO! It…was not fun, but it’s done 🙂 I warmed up with a 2 1/2 mile run, lifted, and cooled down with a 1/4th mile walk. I felt accomplished and strong! Tomorrow I plan to run and Wednesday morning I plan to do my upper and lower body (i.e. full body) strength routine. And then Thursday will be a rest day 😀

..::My Business Update!::..

I am starting a private practice with 2 other Registered Dietitians. Together we are Mid Ohio Nutrition Specialists!  Please check our our website — feedback is welcomed! We are in the editing stages and are very excited to see things taking off! We are pitching our business to the largest group of neprhrologists in Ohio come January and we couldn’t be happier! In the meantime, we are busy building our Diabetes Self-Management Education (DSME) courses which will be submitted for AADE accreditation in the next 4-6 weeks. We are seeing Medicare patients with chronic kidney disease and diabetes in physician offices, a service that is reimbursable for Registered Dietitians. It’s exciting, and busy!

Thanks for all of your support! 😀

Question: What’s your favorite condiment?

P.S. A great article on high-fructose corn syrup, for those interested..

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Filed under diabetes, dialysis & kidney disease, dietitians, exercise, fried food, guilt-free, physicians, recipe, running, Uncategorized

My New Job: End Stage Renal Disease

My new job is in renal dietetics and I will be working as a dietitian in dialysis facilities caring for those with End Stage Renal (Kidney) Disease (ESRD). Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) is the declining function of the kidneys and affects more than 26 million Americans, or 1 out of ever 9 adults. As kidney function declines, CKD progresses and when the kidneys perform at about 10% capacity, a patients is considered to have ESRD, which requires transplantation or dialysis to stay alive.

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What is dialysis?

There are two types of dialysis: hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis. I will be working in hemodialysis and will expand on that type, but you can read all about peritoneal dialysis. Hemodialysis is traditionally performed in a dialysis clinic where patients come 3x a week (either Monday, Wednesday, Friday or Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday) and are dialyzied (blood filtered) for 3-4 hours through an access site, typically on their arm.

What do the kidneys do?

The kidneys perform a lot of vital functions of the body including filtering the blood to remove waste (e.g. urine) and the release of hormones which regulate blood pressure and bone health. When the kidneys lose filtering capacity, vitamins and minerals build-up in the blood at toxic levels. Micronutrients such as potassium, sodium, phosphorous, and calcium can cause fatalities in renal patients if not controlled in the diet. The diet is hugely important to follow for renal patients.

Why do the kidneys fail?

Chronic uncontrolled blood pressure, chronic uncontrolled diabetes, glomerular disease, and other complications such as polycystic kidney disease, drug abuse (prescription and illicit), poisons, and trauma. The rate of ESRD is increasing due to the increase of obesity and associated co-morbidities such as diabetes and hypertension.

What diet do dialysis patients have to follow?

Foods that are commonly omitted or limited from the renal diet include: beans, peanut butter, nuts, many cereals and grains, all dairy products, colas, processed meats, orange juice, oranges, bananas, tomatoes, tomato products, kiwi, pears, melon, dried fruits, potatoes, squash, avocado, mushrooms, pumpkin, chocolate, and WATER and all other fluids.

However, the renal diet is highly personalized to a patient’s needs based on their labs and may be changed on a frequent basis.

Renal diets need to be very high in protein — about 95 grams (for a 150 pound adult) or 140 grams (for a 220 pound adult). And because processed meats, beans, and nuts are discouraged in the renal population, fresh meat and eggs are the only sources of high biological value protein (HBV). A renal patient requires significant amounts of protein due to protein loss during dialysis, as well as a decline in the body’s ability to make amino acids (protein in the body) due to CKD.

What if a patient doesn’t eat enough protein?

Albumin is a protein made by the liver. This lab value has the strongest correlation to morbidity (illness) and mortality (death) in the renal population. In addition to drug therapies, the diet is the best way to elevate albumin levels.

This is a perfect example of why I support all food groups. A vegetarian/vegan would not fare well on dialysis based on their food preferences. Simply, there are NO methods available to achieve neither adequate intake, nor intake from high biological value proteins.

I hope this gives an idea of what my new job entails. Today I meet the entire patient care team: nephrologist, charge nurse, social worker, and me, the dietitian. We have rounds starting…soon! Better jet! 😀

But first a quick Lily picture. On our way to the dog park yesterday…

Question: Knowing what a renal diet aims to limit or eliminate, what would you have the most trouble omitting?

I think limiting fluids, tomato products, and bananas would be the hardest for me!

P.S. I am a writer for the Examiner in Columbus! I cover cooking! It’s been a slow start simply because I haven’t had time or Internet, but I look to put out a lot more articles soon! 😀

Happy Monday,

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Filed under chronic disease, diabetes, diet, dietitians, Examiner, fruits and vegetables, hormones, hypertension, meat consumption, obesity epidemic, physicians, protein, sodium, vegan, water, work

Communicating a Healthy Message

On our flight back from Columbus, I was catching up with my Today’s Dietitian (are you seeing a trend with my reading on flights?). In May’s issue there was an interesting article entitled, “Keys to Clear Communication”. I found this article not only relevant to a conversation Gina and I had on Thursday, but also because it’s pertinent to my current role as an out-patient dietitian. Plus, an old professor of mine from the University of Illinois, Karen Chapman-Novakofski, was quoted in the article. Neat!

In my day-to-day work, I see patients of varying ethnic background, varying education levels, varying health concerns, and various other potential barriers to communicating a healthy message. With over half of the leading causes of death linked to poor nutrition, dietitians have an important task of tailoring nutrition messages in a way which they can not only understand, but put to use in their lives.

It’s fair to say that if you’ve made it this far, you are not illiterate. However, the National Adult Literacy Survey from 1993 indicated that approximately 25% of US adults may lack the literacy skills to function at an “average” level in today’s modern society. Sad, isn’t it? I have encountered several patients who could not read or write, making it a challenge to teach concepts of nutrition and disease management. And to make the dietitian’s task even more challenging, up to 80% of patients forget everything their doctor told them by the time they leave the office. It has happened more than once that a patient comes in with some “concerning lab work”. Was it the cholesterol? Blood pressure? Blood sugar? My guess is as good as the patient’s. Good thing for medical records, huh?

When I was talking with Gina , she shared how much she enjoys speaking to large groups about nutrition and that she’s able to breakdown complex concepts to an easy to understand message. When speaking to groups, I do the opposite – assume that I’m over-simplifying concepts that people are already familiar with. And sadly, that has never been the case. I shared with Gina that I am more comfortable in a one-on-one setting because I like to “feel out” a patient and individualize the session based on the patient’s needs.

The Today’s Dietitian article lists several tips for counseling patients, particularly those with limited literacy:

  1. Limit the number of concepts you teach. As the practitioner, it is up to you to decide what change will make the most impact on the patient’s health and nutrition status. Hone in on that topic.
  2. Use simple jargon. A patient will much more likely understand “average blood sugar” than “HbA1c” or “weight for height” than “BMI”.
  3. Organize your message to highlight your most important message(s). For example, don’t relay an important message at the beginning of your 60-minute session and not address it in the remaining 50 minutes.
  4. Ask patients to summarize or teach back important messages. Ask leading questions such as, “So what are some of your favorite foods that you now know contain too much saturated fat? What might be a healthier alternative?”
  5. Listen. Truly listen. Patients know whether or not you’re listening. You can chart during your session, but remember to make good eye contact and non-verbal cues that you’re paying attention – nodding your head, smiling, etc.
  6. Use demonstrations and hands-on teaching tools. In my job, food models, nutrition labels, and empty food boxes and containers are essential to have on hand. I use my food models and food labels on a daily basis, all day long.

In addition to handouts to review with patients, I am sure to add my own personal notes, asterisks, and highlighting. I also encourage literate patients to take notes of anything they find important or wish to record. And I typically end counseling sessions with goal-setting and send the patient home with a copy of goals they set.

I believe individuals all learn in different ways and it’s imperative to relay a message in the appropriate way for it to be most beneficial and apt to drive change. In the past year, I’ve noticed a profound growth in my ability to relay complex messages and empower patients to make healthy changes in their lives. Just as my old professor was quoted in saying, I too find it most rewarding when a patient says to me, “I’ve been a diabetic for so many years, and this is the first time any of this has made any sense to me.”

Talk about rewarding.

Question: Have you ever left a medical appointment or counseling session of any sort feeling as though you gained nothing? Or that it was a waste of your time? When you think of your doctor, why or why not do you like he or she?

Here’s to a great week,

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Filed under BMI, chronic disease, diabetes, dietitians, doctors, physicians, work

Not so private push-ups

So I had my medication check-up yesterday. For the past month, I have been taking 500 milligrams of Metformin twice daily to help control my insulin resistance from PCOS. Sadly, I have noted little to no change in my blood glucose or my weight (1 pound down – woot! *eye roll*)…

Quick embarrassing story: While I was waiting for the doc to come into the exam room yesterday, I decided to get my push ups out of the way for Heather’s 100 Push-Up Challenge. Yes, doctor’s offices are germ-laden, but I work in a health clinic…nothing there I’m not already exposed to day-in and day-out. As I was on the floor doing my push-ups, my doc walked in. With a medical student. No knock to warn they were entering.They both had a puzzled look on their face and as I climbed up to my feet, blushing, I explained that I was doing push-ups. They thought I was quite committed to be utilizing my wait time so effectively! 😉

Anyway, my doc doubled my dose and I am now prescribed 1,000 milligrams twice daily. While I’m bummed, I understand that I have to do what it takes…and that also means not giving up on weight loss and giving more attention to my eating habits and exercise regimen. What was a tad VERY depressing was the fact that I will likely be on Metformin for the rest of my life. Did I mention I hate taking pills? 😦

On that note, I have FINALLY started my page on PCOS and Insulin Resistance. Check it out! After reading A Patient’s Guide to PCOS, I feel assured that I’m doing so much right…and that I am NOT alone. There are so many PCOS sufferers out there, and I feel so much better about the situation when I tackle it head-on versus throwing pity parties for myself. So yep, check out the info on PCOS. I put a lot of thought into it and hope that it can help other women and PCOS sufferers find answers and comfort.

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And in honor of my hosting BSI this week…another recipe featuring PAPRIKA! This one, I swear, was a surprise! Cooking Light and I were on the same page with paprika this week, apparently!

Smoky Spanish-Style Pan Roast from Cooking Light June 2010

1  pound small red new potatoes, halved
2  tablespoons  olive oil
3/4  teaspoon  salt, divided
1/2  teaspoon  freshly ground black pepper, divided
3/4  pound  unpeeled large shrimp
1/4  pound  Spanish chorizo, thinly sliced
1  pound  green beans, trimmed
4  garlic cloves, chopped
1/2  cup  pilsner beer
1/2  teaspoon  Spanish smoked paprika
2  red bell peppers, cut into thin strips
1/4  cup  fresh flat-leaf parsley leaves

Directions:Preheat oven to 400° F.

Combine potatoes, oil, 1/2 teaspoon salt, and 1/4 teaspoon black pepper in a large roasting pan, tossing well to coat potatoes. Arrange potatoes in a single layer, cut side down, in pan. Bake at 400° for 15 minutes or until potatoes are lightly browned.

While potatoes cook, peel shrimp, leaving tails intact. Devein shrimp, if desired. Set shrimp aside.

Stir chorizo, green beans, garlic, remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, and remaining 1/4 teaspoon black pepper into pan. Bake at 400° for 10 minutes. Add beer, paprika, and bell pepper, scraping pan to loosen browned bits. Nestle shrimp into vegetable mixture. Bake at 400° for 10 minutes or until potatoes and green beans are tender and shrimp are done. Sprinkle with fresh parsley leaves. Serves 4 (approx. 1 1/2 cups per serving).

Nutrition Information (per serving): 392 calories; 15.5 g. fat (3.8 g. saturated, 8.5 g. monounsaturated, 2.4 g. polyunsaturated);
28 g. protein; 36.6 g. carbohydrate; 7.7 g. fiber; 129 mg. cholesterol; 590 mg. sodium

Result: Again, easy and delicious! I planned this recipe to use the leftover chorizo from last night’s Grilled Salmon with Chorizo and Fingerlings. I will definitely be making it again. The dish was light with a huge punch of beer and paprika flavor…right up my alley!

Don’t Forget!!

I’ve already received several paprika recipes for the Blogger Secret Ingredient Contest! You have until Sunday at 5PM Central Time to submit yours!

Random questoin: What’s something you know a lot about, or would consider yourself an “expert” in? What topic do you wish you knew more about? Doesn’t have to be nutrition, fitness, or health-related at all…just curious!

Have a wonderful day!


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Filed under beer, blood glucose, book, carb-controlled, challenge, chronic disease, Cooking Light, diabetes, diet, dietitians, doctors, exercise, healthy cooking, hormones, MUFAs and PUFAs, PCOS, physical activity, physicians, prescription drug, recipe, weight loss

A Day in the Life of an RD

I recieved a lovely email from a reader this week who wanted me to write up a little something on a “Day in the Life of an RD”…so, I did! I get a lot of emails about people pursuing a career in dietetics, or a career change to dietetics, and various questions about the educational and career paths for dietitians…and I am always happy to help! I am passionate about what I do and truly, whole-heartedly LOVE my work. It’s not work if you love what you do, right? 😉

As a little background, I work as a dietitian in an out-patient clinic in a rural community outside of Tulsa. For patient safety and to remain compliant with HIPPA laws, I cannot disclose identifiable information on patients or my place of work. We do have several physicians on staff as well as 8 nurses, 4 pharmacists and pharmacy technicians, 2 dietitians, ultrasound technician, radiology technician, physiologists, ophthalmologists and optometrists, phlebotomists (and a laboratory), as well as per diem podiatrists, endocrinologists, pediatricians, etc. Basically, we are one-stop shop for health care and accept all major medical coverage and insurance.

I work Monday through Thursday, 7am to 5:30pm and for the most part schedule my own patients. If a referral is made for the dietitian, a receptionist books a patient in for a 1-hour appointment. I see primarily diabetic and bariatric patients, as well as those needing diet assistance to manage other conditions such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, anemia, non-alcoholic fatty liver, metabolic syndrome, gout, renal insufficiency, pre-natal nutrition, and digestive health (i.e. Crohn’s, Celiac disease, etc.). But it is fair to say 80% or more of my time is spent on diabetes and bariatrics. I work on 30-minute slots and bill for medical nutrition therapy in 15-minute increments.

Let me set the scene…

Currently, I am pursuing the Certified Diabetes Educator (CDE) credential. I currently have 445 hours and need 1,000 to sit for the exam. Logging my hours:

This is (part of) the form RD’s use to chart in my clinic. We are making the switch the Electronic Health Records (EHR) in the coming months.

Here is how insulin pens work:

Breakfast at my desk:

My work station:

Lunch at my desk:

Employee Taste Test Sign-Up!

Tuesday went something like this…

7-8am: Check my schedule (no 7:30am appointment – woo!), catch up on emails, eat breakfast at my desk, and finish any charting left from the previous day

8am: New onset type 2 diabetic wanting to control blood glucose through diet and exercise. Full diabetes diet and glucometer education completed. Discussed the role of oral agents to help control diabetes (45 minutes)

9am: Weight management follow-up – patient is trying to lose 40 lbs for her 50th birthday in 5 months – down 9 lbs in 3 months so far (60 minutes)

10:30am: Uncontrolled diabetic on insulin – discussed recommitting after “falling off the wagon” (45 minutes)

11:20am: Uncontrolled type 1 diabetic following up regarding carbohydrate to insulin ratio. Food journals and insulin regimens reviewed, glucometer downloaded to analyze. Recommended no changes in insulin dosing as fasting and post-prandial blood glucose goals were being met (45 minutes)

12:30pm: Surprise appointment! I went out to my car to get my water bottle and a patient asked me in the street to download his glucometer and give him more testing strips. The patient is a controlled type 2 diabetic who I have worked closely with over the course of 9 months to get his blood glucose levels within normal limits. He now journals all of his intake and checks his blood glucose up to 6x a day (45 minutes)

1:15pm: QUICK 5 minute lunch at my desk

1:20pm: Weight management follow-up. Patient lost 4.3 lbs in 2 weeks on a 1,800 calorie diet. Patient is considering bariatric surgery through our clinic (30 minutes)

2pm: Weight management follow-up. Patient lost 3.5 lbs in 2 weeks. Young, disruptive child present at session. Patient goals include meal planning and making food stamps last longer throughout the month (45 minutes)

2:45pm: Patient was rescheduled – he did not bring his glucometer or food journals/pattern management to meeting and therefore no insulin adjustments could be made.

3pm: Follow-up with uncontrolled type 2 diabetic on insulin and strict pattern management. Called patient’s physician and recommended a change in Levemir (long-acting insulin) – verbal order given over the phone (30 minutes)

3:45pm: Follow-up weight management and uncontrolled hypertension; 0.8 lb weight gain in 2 weeks. Patient was seeking advice on diet pills and how to manage “dieting” with unsupportive friends, co-workers, and husband (45 minutes)

4:30pm: Weight management follow-up – I have been seeing this patient for 9 months without significant weight loss, yet she attends all of our appointments and wants to continue coming to RD meetings (30 minutes)

5-5:30pm: Catch-up on charting, returns urgent emails and phone calls, and head home!

WHEW!

There were 14 appointments scheduled on this day – 2 called to cancel, 2 no-showed, and I had 1 walk-in patient.

Likes and Dislikes

I love the critical thinking and intense patient-provider interaction involved in diabetes care. Plus, I do have some of the best patients :). And most of you know I am passionate about diabetes, I love working in diabetes. I hate the early hours…mornings are rough…and the fact that most blogs are blocked at work 😦 And…I can always want more money, right? 😉

There you have it…a Day in the Life of an RD!

Question: What is your current profession? What do you love and hate most about YOUR current role?

Work hard 😉 ,

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Filed under blog topic request, blood glucose, breakfast, chronic disease, diabetes, diet, dietitians, healthy cooking, hypertension, lunch, physicians, prescription drug, Uncategorized, US health care, weight gain, weight loss, weight maintentance, work

RD’s dismiss low-carb & my 10-miler

You guys are SMART cookies! I really, really appreciate your feedback on carbohydrate and how dangerous low-carb diets can be. If you don’t believe me, Melinda (RD), Estela (RD), Joanne (med student), Nour (RD) and Kristen (RD) all agree. These are the people consumers should be consulting before starting such a regimen, not some crazy magazine or message board. There’s more to health than weight loss, and drastic, unsafe measures to shed a few pounds are not a means to an end. There is nothing 1) safe, or 2) maintainable about 20-60 grams of carbohydrate a day. The American Diabetes Association recommends an absolutely MINIMUM of 130 grams a day for diabetics! You can only imagine what someone with properly functioning insulin and an active lifestyle requires.

I’ve done Atkins, pre-nutrition education. I lost about 60 pounds and “felt great” (dang, that ketosis!). The second my lips touched a sandwich, weight would creep back on and that lifestyle of ketosis was no longer serving me well. My kidneys thanked me for decreasing my protein post-Atkins, too. Those suckers have to work major over-time to process all of that protein!

If you follow an ultra low-carb diet, the above is not to make you feel bad. It’s to make you aware, because I do care! I get emails a lot from people on fad diets and dangerous diet pills. This is information the general public is not educated on. And as someone in prevention, I want to get information out there to help others live the healthiest, happiest, and longest life they deserve.

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Soooo my 10-miler was actually really great! The last 10 minutes were tough, but I learned not to doubt myself so much! I had reason to be a bit nervous  as I haven’t been able to get in my short training runs due to crazy work days and hockey games lately. While these are excuses and not reasons (there is a difference!), I have learned through distane racing in the past, the long runs are the ones you need not skip!!!

I fueled with this:

1 1/2 mini POM Wonderfuls mixed with water (in my favorite hockey water bottle!) and a liter of water

I finished 10 miles in 1:53:09 (11:19/mile) which is a bit faster than my 9-miler 2 weeks ago which I ran at a 11:23 pace in 1:42:30! I did have SERIOUS calf cramps in both legs following my run, however. I’ve never had that issue before and I think it might be a side effect of my new medication 😦

So, the 5K tonight maybe be more of an event than a race. I haven’t registered yet because I wanted to see how my legs felt today, and they are barkin’! We’ll see what they’re doing by this evening 🙂 I have a hockey game tomorrow, too…so I may be walking tonight, or cheering on Mr. Prevention who is hoping to set a PR! We’ll see!

Off to the Farmer’s Market…a new one this week in my town! 😀

Question: As a health-savvy person (which you are if you’re reading!), do you try and educate others on what you know about nutrition and how to achieve safe weight loss? Do others receive this well, or are they a bit cold to the advice?

and on a lighter note…

What’s for breakfast? I’m starving!!!

Bring on the sun,

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Filed under diet, dietitians, doctors, exercise, low-carb, physical activity, physicians, protein, running, Uncategorized