Category Archives: doctors

Vegan Acorn Squash Muffins

**MAJOR issues with a switch in WordPress themes!!! My home page appears to be okay but all the other pages are a mess! I am working to get this fixed ASAP…sorry!!!**

Guys, I can tell it’s going to be one of THOSE weeks. I completely forgot about a 10th anniversary surgery center dinner party I said I would go to with my business partner last night. Glad she sent me a reminder text that afternoon! The event (and food!) was wonderful, but I am not a fan of 12 hour days. I much prefer the life-work balance. I put “life” before “work” because I am so much a fan of that balance…with a tip in the “life” direction 😉

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I adore squash…butternut squash, spaghetti squash, yellow squash…love’em all, but I do believe acorn is my favorite. It is so incredibly sweet and when cooked properly it is a creamy, almost dessert-like texture and flavor. Plus, I grew up on acorn squash filled with butter, pecans, brown sugar, and maple syrup. 😉 Yumm! Mr. Prevention isn’t too crazy about squash, so I used an acorn squash on hand to make this week’s breakfast! You know how I love sneaking veggies into breakfast…nothing like a jump start on your 5-9 colorful F&V’s each day!

Vegan Acorn Squash Muffins from A Whisk and A Prayer

1 cup + 2 Tbsp acorn squash, cooked and mashed (~1 small acorn squash)
3/4 cup soy milk (I used hemp milk)
2/3 cup brown sugar
1/3 cup water
¼ cup canola oil
2 Tbsp molasses
2 cup whole wheat pastry flour
2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp baking soda
½ tsp salt
½ tsp ground cinnamon
1/8 tsp ground nutmeg

Directions:

Preheat oven to 400° F and lightly oil a muffin tin, or line with baking cups. In a large bowl, mix together puree, milk, brown sugar, water, oil and molasses. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder, soda, salt, and spices.

Combine wet and dry mixtures until just mixed.

Spoon batter evenly into prepared pan, filling muffin cups about 3/4 full. Bake for 20-25 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the center of a muffin comes out clean. Yield: 15 muffins.

Nutrition Information (per muffin): 138 calories; 4.3 g. fat; 0 mg. cholesterol; 229 mg. sodium; 23.7 g. carbohydrate; 2.1 g. fiber; 0.3 g. protein

Result: These were really, really good! A lot sweeter than I was expecting. The original recipe called for a glaze, but I don’t think they need it, especially since I like to have muffins for breakfast, not dessert 🙂 Like most vegan baked goods, they are very moist. 🙂 And check out those nutrition stats…woo!

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Over the weekend, Mr. Prevention and I shared one of our favorites: Chimay. I am completely and totally FASCINATED by Chimay.

Chimay beer is brewed in Belgium by Trappist Monks. Trappist brewery proceeds are used to support the monastery and good causes. The majority of the brewery profits go to local charities and community development. How awesome is that?

Chimay beers are cellared for at least 5 years while the Chimay Bleue Grande Reserve (pictured above, 9% ABV) is aged for approximately 15 years. The water used to make the beer is drawn from a well on the monastery property and the filtered beer solids are recycled for livestock feed, fed to the cows used to produce Chimay cheeses. Charitable AND green…rock on, monks!

Not only do I find the history and philanthropic nature of the Chimay brewery to be upstanding and impressive, but the beer is incredible. Mr. Prevention most enjoys the Chimay Blanche, while I prefer the darker Chimay Bleue. Chimay is available in most larger liquor stores, as well as Whole Foods and Trader Joe’s. Check’em out!

Question: Do you make an effort to support companies with a stand-up mission and green operations? If you’re a beer-drinker, have you had or heard of Chimay?

Cheers,

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Filed under alcohol, beer, breakfast, doctors, fiber, fruits and vegetables, going "green", guilt-free, healthy cooking, MUFAs and PUFAs, recipe, Trader Joe's, Uncategorized, vegan, vegetarian, work

productive day #2!

Wheeeew! Being productive is getting exhausting! I may have to slow things down a bit today 😉

Yesterday morning started off with a strength session (go, self!) and then a quick shower before throwing dinner in the crock pot. I dashed out the door with my hair in a frizzy mess and worked until after 7pm (I didn’t get to break away from the nephrologist until 4pm — I was GROWLING for lunch!). I got in the door at 8pm and the smells of Thanksgiving infused the house. YUM! Mr. Prevention had even followed directions for our brussel’s sprouts. Impressive. The crock pot and I are officially bonding, I would say…another successful crock pot meal 😀

8 am:

8 pm:

Note: You can’t judge a crock pot recipe by looks alone!! 😉

Cranberry Pork Roast from A Year of Slow Cooking and Bean Town Baker

1 (2.5-3 lb) pork tenderloin (I used 2 1/2#), trimmed
1 tsp ground ginger
1/2 tsp dried mustard
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper
2 Tbsp cornstarch
1 cup fresh cranberries
1/2 1/4 cup white sugar + 1/4 cup Splenda granular
1/2 1/4 cup + 2 Tbsp brown sugar
1/3 cup golden raisins
1 3 cloves garlic, chopped
1/3 cup diet cranberry juice made with Splenda
1/2 small lemon, thinly sliced

Directions:

Use a 4 quart crockpot. In a plastic zipper bag, put dry spices and cornstarch and add meat. Shake to coat. Put contents into your slow cooker.

Add cranberry sauce, or your fresh cranberries and sugar. Put in raisins and garlic. Pour in cranberry juice, and top with lemon slices.

Cover and cook on low for 8 hours (I cooked mine for 12 hours), or high for about 4. The longer you cook the meat, the more tender it will be. Serves 7 (about 5 ounces after being cooked).

Nutrition Information (per serving): 374 calories; 7.8 g. fat; 128 mg. cholesterol; 261 mg. sodium; 28.3 g. carbohydrate; 1.1 g. fiber; 46 g. protein

Result: It was an early Thanksgiving in the Prevention household! What a nice surprise! We loved this dish – it was so tender, and because of the low and slow cooking time with the long duration, the meat shredded with a fork. Mr. Prevention preferred this pork to the Slow Cooked Char Siu Pork I made last week. I liked both, but I definitely appreciate the leanness of the tenderloin cut – very low fat!! If you’re looking for an early T-day treat, look no further…it’s the perfect fall delight!

And Mr. P managed to put the Brussel’s sprouts in the oven…

1 lb Brussel’s sprouts tossed in olive oil, 1/4 cup pecans, salt, and pepper. Roast for 35 minutes at 350° F. Sprinkle with 1-2 ounces of Gorgonzola and bake another 3-4 minutes. DELISH!

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I emailed lots of fellow RD and bloggers yesterday morning to see who would be interested in collaborating on a RD Q&A. I’ve had an amazing response and I look forward to adding a tab on my blog about becoming an RD, the schooling involved, what internships are like, job outlook for RD’s, career paths for RD’s, and our best advice for those entering the field. I get questions weekly from readers who are interested in nutrition, and I hope that joining forces with other RD’s and bloggers will help those interested! So look for that in a week or so! I’m excited!

Question: What did you want to be when you were a little kid?

I remember wanting to be a professional figure skater…and now I play ice-hockey. My, how things change! 😉

Bon voyage to my parental unit who are off to the shores of Puerto Vallarta for the week. I am green with envy! Off to work I go…!

Have a fabulous day!

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Filed under blog, blog topic request, crock pot, dietitians, dinner, doctors, exercise, fruits and vegetables, garlic, healthy cooking, hockey, hunger, meat consumption, physical activity, physicians, protein, recipe, sugar substitutes, travel, work

fall means roast in the crock pot to me…you?

It’s rare I go to the grocery store and purchase a several pound piece of meat (i.e. beef, pork, whole chicken, etc.) — it intimidates me. And call me crazy, but I’ve never been a huge fan of touching raw meat…it kinda takes away from my enjoying the final product. But, I like meat and sometimes that means buying and handling large hunks of meat. And I don’t know about you, but something about fall makes me want a roast in the crock pot all day long getting nice and tender. Which lead me to this recipe, and it did not disappoint!

Slow Cooker Char Siu Pork Roast from Cooking Light

1/4 cup low-sodium soy sauce
1/4 cup hoisin sauce
3 Tbsp ketchup
3 Tbsp honey
2 tsp bottled minced garlic
2 tsp grated peeled fresh ginger
1 tsp dark sesame oil
1/2 tsp five-spice powder
2  pounds boneless Boston butt pork roast, trimmed
1/2 cup  fat-free, less-sodium chicken broth

Directions:

Combine first 8 ingredients in a small bowl, stirring well with a whisk. Place in a large zip-top plastic bag. Add pork to bag; seal. Marinate in refrigerator at least 2 hours, turning occasionally.

Place pork and marinade in an electric slow cooker. Cover and cook on low for 8-12 hours.

Remove pork from slow cooker using a slotted spoon; place on a cutting board or work surface. Cover with aluminum foil; keep warm.

Add broth to sauce in slow cooker. Cover and cook on low for 30 minutes or until sauce thickens. Shred pork with 2 forks; serve with sauce. Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 3 ounces pork and 1/4 cup sauce).

Nutrition Information (per serving): 227 calories; 73 mg. cholesterol; 561 mg. sodium; 9.5 g. fat; 12.7 g. carbohydrate; 0.4 g. fiber; 21.6 g. protein

Result: This recipe was easy and delicious! The recipe called for 8 hours of  cooking on low, but I was gone at least 12 hours today and the roast was just fine. It literally FELL apart, no shredding required. I struggled with what to serve with the pork and I landed on fresh bread and an arugula salad…a very simple, flavorful, and easy fall meal. 😀 Mr. P really liked this recipe, too. He compared it to BBQ pulled pork (silly man…) and proceeded to slather about 1/2 cup of BBQ sauce on his meat, but whatever. I found it to be juicy and PLENTY moist and flavorful. Mr. P tends to ruin any flavor with condiments, but I try to refrain from stopping him! I am just glad it wasn’t buffalo wing sauce *eye roll*

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Thank you for all of your kind words about my migraine. I forgot to mention how I called the Walgreens pharmacist MY HERO as he handed over my migraine medicine. Ends up, I didn’t have a script to refill and he found an “emergency dose script” in an old order (???). I’ve never heard of this before, but I wasn’t going to questing anything with that debilitating migraine…it was everything in me not to beg, plead, and cry for the meds. And if I’m being truthful, there were tears…it was THAT bad. BUT, alas, I was a new woman yesterday morning…and I feel great! For anyone who suffers from migraines, you all the empathy in the world coming from me!

My first upper body strength workout went well…but slightly torturous, not going to lie. It was tough, but in a good way. I hope I can keep it up! And in response to a few emails, I am still candy-free!  Thanks for keeping me motivated, folks! 😀

Question: What was your best ever Halloween costume?

I think mine was as a bee in college. I remember “stinging” quite a few young men and having a lot of fun!

P.S. Keep your eyes peeled for some information on my private practice nutrition company! We got some exciting news today and I’m anxious to share…just waiting for our website to launch and then I’ll spill all!! 😀

Have a spoooky day,

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Filed under challenge, condiments, Cooking Light, crock pot, dietitians, dinner, doctors, exercise, healthy cooking, low-carb, physical activity, prescription drug, protein, recipe, salad, work

A “Prevention Classic” & A Symposium Mistake

Remember how I said I was going a Diabetes Symposium yesterday and today? Well, here’s a little story from yesterday.

At my table was a type 1 diabetic, who was also a doctor. About 10 minutes before lunch I saw her check her blood sugar and take a shot of insulin. I wasn’t staring, promise. P.S. It’s probably not acceptable to draw blood and/or give yourself an injection at just any dining table, but here…totally acceptable. Anyways, lunch was served and it was a salad. On a dinner plate came Iceburg lettuce, shredded carrots, black olives, diced tomatoes, and about 4 garbanzo beans (I counted, no lie). You could add hard boiled egg crumbles and croutons, and there were dinner rolls to pass — enough for one person at each table. Lots of details, yes…but here’s why. That was lunch. Period. They cleared the spoon, forks (x2), and knife. Why lay out 2 forks for each guest when they only needed 1, by the way?

While I was cranky at 3pm, that was small change compared to that doctor sitting next to me who shoveled down 2 large cookies before she hit the ground from hypoglycemia. She said that last year when she attended the event it was a soup/salad, entree + starch, dinner roll, and dessert type of meal, thus requiring a bolus (insulin dose) to cover 30-45 grams of carbohydrate, which is what she took before yesterday’s lunch. However, that salad + dinner roll was about 15 grams of carbohydrate, max. It blows my mind as to how a DIABETES SYMPOSIUM filled with DIABETES PROFESSIONALS (and DIABETICS!) planned such a poor menu!! I felt terrible for that woman…and any other diabetics attending (which there were several — I saw their insulin pumps). Anyways, just wanted to share that — it’s a great lesson in meal planning and how important it is to prepare BALANCED menus.

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Mr. Prevention loves fajitas. When we lived in Italy I swear I made fajitas once a week. And no, you did not read that wrong. In Italy…making fajitas. Mr. P missed the comfort foods of home: Mexican food! Now that we occasionally go out for Mexican food, he doesn’t request fajitas at home all too often. In fact, it was me craving the fajitas and boy were they good 😉

In order to keep things fresh and new, I tried making homemade fajita seasoning…and it was a huge success! Loved it!

Fajita Seasoning from Busy Cooks

3 Tbsp cornstarch
2 Tbsp chili powder
1 Tbsp 2 tsp salt
1 Tbsp paprika
1 Tbsp sugar
2-1/2 tsp crushed chicken bouillon cubes (3 cubes)
1-1/2 tsp onion powder
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
1/4 tsp crushed red pepper flakes
1/2 tsp cumin

Directions:

Combine all of the ingredients in a small bowl. Pour into small glass or plastic container, seal tightly and store in a cool, dry place. Yield: the equivalent of 3 packets of commercial or purchased Fajita Seasoning Mix

Nutrition Information (per “packet” equivalent — serves about 4): 78 calories (19 calories per serving); 1 g. fat; 0 mg. cholesterol; 2465 mg. sodium (~616 mg. per serving); 16 g. carbohydrate; 2.6 g. fiber; 5.3 g. sugar; 1.3 g. protein

Prevention Fajitas

1 1/2 lb boneless skinless chicken breast, cut into strips
1 green bell pepper, cut into strips
1 red bell peppers, cut into strips
1 yellow or orange bell pepper, cut into strips
1 large onion, sliced
2 tomatoes, sliced
1 “packet” of fajita seasoning (recipe above)

Directions:

Heat a wok or large pan over medium-high heat. Add chicken, 1/2 “packet” or fajita seasoning (about 1 1/2 tablespoons) + 2-3 tablespoons of water. Cook chicken until nearly cooked through. Add veggies and add remaining fajita seasoning and additional water, if needed. Cook until veggies are tender. Yield: 4 servings (about 2 fajitas)

Nutrition Information (per serving): 246 calories; 4.5 g. fat; 128 mg. cholesterol; 679 mg. sodium; 16 g. carbohydrate; 3.8 g. fiber; 4.3 g. sugar; 40 g. protein

Result: Both were YUMMY! If you’re a fajita lover, you will love these 🙂 There’s nothing hard about fajitas, just need the right seasoning!

Question: What do you order when you’re at a Mexican restaurant? And is it inappropriate if I share my disappointment in yesterday’s lunch menu on the symposium evaluation?

TGIF!!!

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Filed under blood glucose, carbohydrates, chronic disease, diabetes, diet, dietitians, doctors, fruits and vegetables, healthy cooking, Italy, low-carb, lunch, recipe, salad

I’m a scrub

Thank goodness today is the last day to my work week…yesterday was SOOOO busy! I had a packed schedule of patients and our docs kept coming in with walk-ins, it was crazy busy! My busiest day as an RD yet, believe it or not! And of course, I felt like poo. But, alas, I AM finally feeling better. 😀 I even managed to get in some weeding and a short 2-mile run last night. While I didn’t want to run at all whatsoever…I did anyways. I don’t want to get behind on my 101 Days of Summer challenge goal to run at least 70 of the 101 days of summer. And it’s never a bad deal to catch up with The Hills while jogging 😀

I typically don’t “crave” certain meals because I meal plan through the week. Last night, however, I was craving waffles! And since I am yet to grocery shop (it’s been nearly 2 weeks!), I threw together Cinnamon Apple Waffles!

Cinnamon Apple Topping

2 apples, red variety
2 Tbsp cinnamon
3 Tbsp pure maple syrup

Directions:

Peel and dice apples. Mix apples, cinnamon, and syrup in a sauce pan over medium heat for 10-15 minutes or until softened and caramelized. Serve over waffles or pancakes. Serves 2.

Nutrition Information (per 1/2 of recipe): 150 calories; 0 g. fat; 0 mg. cholesterol; 0 mg. sodium; 41.5 g. carbohydrate; 5 g. fiber

The actual waffle was made from Bob’s Red Mill Buttermilk Pancake and Waffle Mix. Bob’s sent me this mix a few months back and finally got around to trying it. Good thing it stays good for a long time! It was wonderful! 🙂 And the nutrition stats weren’t bad, either! The HUGE Belgian waffle was 400 calories; 20 grams of fat; 200 mg. cholesterol; 525 mg. sodium; 42 g. carbohydrate; 6 g. fiber; and 15 g. protein. While the meal was delicious, I was over my carbohydrates for that meal.

…It was worth it.

I have to show off my garden a bit more today…it’s growing SO fast! Oklahoma = awesome gardening weather!

I spy squash…do youuu?

Heirloom tomatoes… 🙂

Random Question #1: What is your workplace attire? Are you okay with it, or do you wish it were something else?

Random Question #2: Pancakes or waffles? Tough one, I know!

I currently wear scrubs and love it! However, I know that won’t always be the case 😦 RD’s typically wear business casual with a lab coat, and it’s fine…but not as great as scrubs!

Be well,

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Filed under breakfast, carb-controlled, carbohydrates, challenge, diet, dietitians, dinner, doctors, exercise, fiber, fruits and vegetables, garden, low-carb, physical activity, recipe, running, sleep, work

Communicating a Healthy Message

On our flight back from Columbus, I was catching up with my Today’s Dietitian (are you seeing a trend with my reading on flights?). In May’s issue there was an interesting article entitled, “Keys to Clear Communication”. I found this article not only relevant to a conversation Gina and I had on Thursday, but also because it’s pertinent to my current role as an out-patient dietitian. Plus, an old professor of mine from the University of Illinois, Karen Chapman-Novakofski, was quoted in the article. Neat!

In my day-to-day work, I see patients of varying ethnic background, varying education levels, varying health concerns, and various other potential barriers to communicating a healthy message. With over half of the leading causes of death linked to poor nutrition, dietitians have an important task of tailoring nutrition messages in a way which they can not only understand, but put to use in their lives.

It’s fair to say that if you’ve made it this far, you are not illiterate. However, the National Adult Literacy Survey from 1993 indicated that approximately 25% of US adults may lack the literacy skills to function at an “average” level in today’s modern society. Sad, isn’t it? I have encountered several patients who could not read or write, making it a challenge to teach concepts of nutrition and disease management. And to make the dietitian’s task even more challenging, up to 80% of patients forget everything their doctor told them by the time they leave the office. It has happened more than once that a patient comes in with some “concerning lab work”. Was it the cholesterol? Blood pressure? Blood sugar? My guess is as good as the patient’s. Good thing for medical records, huh?

When I was talking with Gina , she shared how much she enjoys speaking to large groups about nutrition and that she’s able to breakdown complex concepts to an easy to understand message. When speaking to groups, I do the opposite – assume that I’m over-simplifying concepts that people are already familiar with. And sadly, that has never been the case. I shared with Gina that I am more comfortable in a one-on-one setting because I like to “feel out” a patient and individualize the session based on the patient’s needs.

The Today’s Dietitian article lists several tips for counseling patients, particularly those with limited literacy:

  1. Limit the number of concepts you teach. As the practitioner, it is up to you to decide what change will make the most impact on the patient’s health and nutrition status. Hone in on that topic.
  2. Use simple jargon. A patient will much more likely understand “average blood sugar” than “HbA1c” or “weight for height” than “BMI”.
  3. Organize your message to highlight your most important message(s). For example, don’t relay an important message at the beginning of your 60-minute session and not address it in the remaining 50 minutes.
  4. Ask patients to summarize or teach back important messages. Ask leading questions such as, “So what are some of your favorite foods that you now know contain too much saturated fat? What might be a healthier alternative?”
  5. Listen. Truly listen. Patients know whether or not you’re listening. You can chart during your session, but remember to make good eye contact and non-verbal cues that you’re paying attention – nodding your head, smiling, etc.
  6. Use demonstrations and hands-on teaching tools. In my job, food models, nutrition labels, and empty food boxes and containers are essential to have on hand. I use my food models and food labels on a daily basis, all day long.

In addition to handouts to review with patients, I am sure to add my own personal notes, asterisks, and highlighting. I also encourage literate patients to take notes of anything they find important or wish to record. And I typically end counseling sessions with goal-setting and send the patient home with a copy of goals they set.

I believe individuals all learn in different ways and it’s imperative to relay a message in the appropriate way for it to be most beneficial and apt to drive change. In the past year, I’ve noticed a profound growth in my ability to relay complex messages and empower patients to make healthy changes in their lives. Just as my old professor was quoted in saying, I too find it most rewarding when a patient says to me, “I’ve been a diabetic for so many years, and this is the first time any of this has made any sense to me.”

Talk about rewarding.

Question: Have you ever left a medical appointment or counseling session of any sort feeling as though you gained nothing? Or that it was a waste of your time? When you think of your doctor, why or why not do you like he or she?

Here’s to a great week,

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Filed under BMI, chronic disease, diabetes, dietitians, doctors, physicians, work

Goitrogenic Foods

Hypothyroidism is one of those whispered-about diagnoses out there that people commonly misunderstand. If a person is struggling with their weight, you’ll commonly hear, “Maybe I have a thyroid problem”. Sure, maybe so. But trust me, hypothyroidism is much more complex than that.

A recent email from a reader, Liz (Hi Liz!) spurred this topic today. When she put in the blog topic request I had a “Doh!” moment. What a great topic to blog about…thank you, Liz!

Hypothyroidism is an very common endocrine disorder which results from underactive thyroid hormone. This thyroid hormone deficiency can be the result of several happenings. But I’m not a physician, so I won’t even go there 🙂 However, you can read all about the pathophysiology. While hypothyroidism is common, mortality rates are incredibly rare. The highest rates of hypothyroidism are found among Caucasian, elderly females.

Symptoms of hypothyroidism include: fatigues, loss of energy, lethargy, weight gain, decreased appetite, sensitivity to cold, dry skin, hair loss, muscle and joint pain, depression, forgetfulness, menstrual irregularities, decreased perspiration, blurred vision, auditory loss, hoarseness, neck and throat pain, thyroid enlargement, fever, goiter, jaundice, bradycardia, and pitting edema. Other biometric symptoms of hypothyroidism include: anemia, dilutional hyponatremia, hyperlipidemia, and elevated creatinine. Phew.

The primary causes of hypothyroidism include iodine deficiency and in developed countries, autoimmune disorder.

As for the diet, there are several recommendations those with hypothyroidism should consider, including:

  • Limiting goitrogenic foods (i.e. brussel’s sprouts, kohlrabi, turnips, rutabaga, radishes, cabbage, kale, and cauliflower). If you choose to consume these foods, do so in moderation and preferably after being cooked.
  • Taking a multivitamin supplement
  • Take vitamins, minerals (e.g. iron, calcium, and vitamin D) 4 hours before or after thyroid medication
  • Consider adopting a low-residue (low-fiber) diet if your medical provider feels your medication is not being properly absorbed
  • Find an endocrinologist you love. A good endocrinologist is worth their weight in gold. Endocrine disorders, such as hypothyroidism, should be treated by an endocrinologist.
  • Limit or avoid soy as it can act as a hormone mnemic.

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And one last recipe tribute to PAPRIKA, Blogger Secret Ingredient for the week!

Grilled Halibut Cod with Peach and Pepper Salsa adapted from Cooking Light June 2010

Salsa:
2 1/2  cups  coarsely chopped peeled yellow peaches (about 1 1/4 pounds)
1 1/3  cups  chopped red bell pepper (about 1 large)
1/2  cup  thinly sliced green onions
1/2  cup  chopped fresh arugula
1/3  cup  fresh lemon juice (about 2 lemons)
2  tablespoons  chopped fresh oregano
1/4  teaspoon  salt
1  habanero pepper, seeded and minced
1  garlic clove, minced

Fish:
2  tablespoons  fresh lemon juice
2  tablespoons olive oil
1  teaspoon smoked paprika
2  garlic cloves, minced
6  (6-ounce) skinless halibut cod fillets
1/2  teaspoon  salt
1/2  teaspoon  freshly ground black pepper
Cooking spray

Directions:

To prepare salsa, combine first 9 ingredients; toss gently. Let stand 30 minutes before serving.
Prepare grill to medium-high heat.

To prepare fish, combine 2 tablespoons juice, oil, paprika, and 2 garlic cloves in a large, shallow glass baking dish, stirring with a whisk. Add fish to juice mixture; turn to coat. Cover and let stand 15 minutes.

Remove fish from marinade; discard marinade. Sprinkle fish evenly with 1/2 teaspoon salt and black pepper. Place fish on a grill rack coated with cooking spray; grill 3 minutes on each side or until desired degree of doneness. Serve fish with salsa. Serves 6 (1 fish filet and 2/3 cup salsa per serving).

Nutrition Information (per serving): 267 calories; 8.6 g. fat (1.2 g. saturated fat, 4.6 monounsaturated, 1.8 g. polyunsaturated); 35.5 g. protein; 11.8 g. carbohydrate; 2.3 g. fiber; 52 mg. cholesterol; 389 mg. sodium

Result: This was really good! The habanero gives a fun zing to the citrus of the salsa. Very light and again, featured not only paprika, but also the grill. I am LOVING the easy clean-up that accompanies cooking on the grill 😀

And a Lily (or should I say Lily’s tongue?) appearance, per Mari’s request 😉

Off to work 😦 I am typically off on Fridays but since Monday was a holiday…off I go…after stopping by Panera for bagels to appease my co-workers 😉

Question: Had you previously heard of goitrogenic foods? Any fun weekend plans? 😀

P.S. Don’t forget to submit BSI entries by Sunday at 5pm CT!

Brainstorming my happy hour selection,

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Filed under alcohol, blog topic request, breakfast, challenge, Cooking Light, diet, dietitians, dinner, doctors, dog, fruits and vegetables, garlic, grilling, guilt-free, healthy cooking, hormones, low-carb, minerals, MUFAs and PUFAs, pets, recipe, US health care, vitamins, weight gain, work